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USS OLYMPIA (C-6/CA-15/CL-15/IX-40)

This battle ship model is all hand-crafted from hard wood with planks on frame construction and painted as the real ship. There are no plastic and this model is ready for display. Model comes with a brass nameplate on the base.

Item Code

Specifications

Packing Volume

BT0029P

104L x 17W x 47H (cm)

39.37L x 6.69W x 18.50H (inch)

0.134 m = 4.73 ft

Battle Ship USS Olympia

USS Olympia Battle Ship Model ready for display

USS Olympia Bow View

USS Olympia model ship

Ship Model USS Olympia

USS Olympia wooden model ship ready for display

Hand-crafted USS Olympia Ship Model

Hand-made Ship Model USS Olympia

USS Olympia (C-6/CA-15/CL-15/IX-40) is a protected cruiser that saw service in the United States Navy from her commissioning in 1895 until 1922. This vessel became famous as the flagship of Commodore George Dewey at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The ship was decommissioned after returning to the U.S. in 1899, but was returned to active service in 1902.

Model war ship USS Olympia - Wooden Model Ship

HISTORY

USS Olympia (C-6/CA-15/CL-15/IX-40) is a protected cruiser that saw service in the United States Navy from her commissioning in 1895 until 1922. This vessel became famous as the flagship of Commodore George Dewey at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The ship was decommissioned after returning to the U.S. in 1899, but was returned to active service in 1902.

She served until World War I as a training ship for naval cadets and as a floating barracks in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1917, she was mobilized again for war service, patrolling the American coast and escorting transport ships.

Following the end of World War I, Olympia participated in the 1919 Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War, and conducted cruises in the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas to promote peace in the unstable Balkan countries. In 1921, the ship carried the remains of World War I's Unknown Soldier from France to Washington, DC, where his body was interred in Arlington National Cemetery. Olympia was decommissioned for the last time in December 1922 and placed in reserve.

In 1957, the U.S. Navy ceded title to the Cruiser Olympia Association, which restored the ship to her 1898 configuration. Since then, Olympia has been a museum ship in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and is now part of the Independence Seaport Museum. Olympia is the oldest steel US warship still afloat.[5] However, the Museum has been unable to fund essential maintenance for the old ship, and attempts to secure outside funding have failed.[citation needed] Therefore the current steward, under direction of the US Navy has put the ship up for availability to new stewards. It will take an estimated ten million dollars to put Olympia in a stable condition.

Olympia was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966.

As of 2012, Olympia's future was uncertain; repairs are desperately needed to keep the ship afloat. Four entities from San Francisco, California, Beaufort, South Carolina, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Washington, DC, are vying to be a new steward, but it is a race against time due to the waterline deterioration of the hull. As the current entities are in competition for the ship, no significant repairs have been made, although the current steward has done some minor repairs. In reaction to this gap in coverage, the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP) has set up a fund repository which, if funds are raised, will be directly applied to immediate repairs of the vessel with the cooperation of the current steward. At the present time, March 2012, the NTHP is considering a triple application by the Naval Historical Foundation, the Historic Naval Ships Association, and the National Maritime Association to have Olympia placed on the NTHP's list of the eleven most endangered "places". The steward applicants from San Francisco (Mare Island), and Beaufort, S.C., have endorsed the application. Despite these positive steps, Olympia is in critical danger due to the lack of funds.

 

 Suggest: Display case to preserve the model from dust

This assembly display case comes with plexiglass.

Picture of the ship in the display case is just for illustration purpose.

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