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BIREME

Model is handcrafted from hard wood with planks on frame construction . Model is fully assembled and ready for display.

 

Item Code

Specifications (the width is including the oars)

Packing Volume

FB0028W

80L x 33W x 47H (cm)

31.49L x 13W x 18.50H (inch)

0.078 m = 2.75 ft

Bireme Model Boat ready for display

Bireme Model Boat

Bireme Bow

Bireme Stern

Bireme, ship with two series of oars in each side, was the precursor of trireme and forms the in-between link evolution from pentikoro to subsequent ships. Biremes were made with thirty or fifty oars and the dimensions of these ships are between: 18-22m length, 3-4 m width, 22 tones displacement and the length of the oars 4-6 m. The most famous biremes were made in Samos from tyrant Polykrates and were named samaines. It was a special type of biremes, made in such a way so that could be used as a tanker and as a battle ship in the same time. For greater stability of the ship the Phoenicians lowered the crinolines (platforms where oarsmen sat). A massive bronze covered battering ram was the main weapon of this narrow high speed bireme. The traditional removable rig was typical. A decorative poop extremity of stern was abruptly bent, similarly to a tail of a scorpion, and the balustrade of the battle platform was covered with the shields of warriors for reinforcement. Phoenicians were considered as the best seamen of the time and many ancient states frequently used them as mercenaries. The bireme displayed is an in-between type made in 450 B. C. The first battle samaines were made in Samos in 250-400 B. C. The effigy-model is a pentikontors bireme, which width is up to 4 meters, united deck, powerful ram-beak and big square sail.

Bireme model boat

Bireme boat

Bireme, ship with two series of oars in each side, was the precursor of trireme and forms the in-between link evolution from pentikoro to subsequent ships. Biremes were made with thirty or fifty oars and the dimensions of these ships are between: 18-22m length, 3-4 m width, 22 tones displacement and the length of the oars 4-6 m. The most famous biremes were made in Samos from tyrant Polykrates and were named samaines. It was a special type of biremes, made in such a way so that could be used as a tanker and as a battle ship in the same time. For greater stability of the ship the Phoenicians lowered the crinolines (platforms where oarsmen sat). A massive bronze covered battering ram was the main weapon of this narrow high speed bireme. The traditional removable rig was typical. A decorative poop extremity of stern was abruptly bent, similarly to a tail of a scorpion, and the balustrade of the battle platform was covered with the shields of warriors for reinforcement. Phoenicians were considered as the best seamen of the time and many ancient states frequently used them as mercenaries.

Bireme, ship with two series of oars in each side, was the precursor of trireme and forms the in-between link evolution from pentikoro to subsequent ships. Biremes were made with thirty or fifty oars and the dimensions of these ships are between: 18-22m length, 3-4 m width, 22 tones displacement and the length of the oars 4-6 m. The most famous biremes were made in Samos from tyrant Polykrates and were named samaines. It was a special type of biremes, made in such a way so that could be used as a tanker and as a battle ship in the same time. For greater stability of the ship the Phoenicians lowered the crinolines (platforms where oarsmen sat). A massive bronze covered battering ram was the main weapon of this narrow high speed bireme. The traditional removable rig was typical. A decorative poop extremity of stern was abruptly bent, similarly to a tail of a scorpion, and the balustrade of the battle platform was covered with the shields of warriors for reinforcement. Phoenicians were considered as the best seamen of the time and many ancient states frequently used them as mercenaries.

Bireme, ship with two series of oars in each side, was the precursor of trireme and forms the in-between link evolution from pentikoro to subsequent ships. Biremes were made with thirty or fifty oars and the dimensions of these ships are between: 18-22m length, 3-4 m width, 22 tones displacement and the length of the oars 4-6 m. The most famous biremes were made in Samos from tyrant Polykrates and were named samaines. It was a special type of biremes, made in such a way so that could be used as a tanker and as a battle ship in the same time. For greater stability of the ship the Phoenicians lowered the crinolines (platforms where oarsmen sat). A massive bronze covered battering ram was the main weapon of this narrow high speed bireme. The traditional removable rig was typical. A decorative poop extremity of stern was abruptly bent, similarly to a tail of a scorpion, and the balustrade of the battle platform was covered with the shields of warriors for reinforcement. Phoenicians were considered as the best seamen of the time and many ancient states frequently used them as mercenaries.

Bireme, ship with two series of oars in each side, was the precursor of trireme and forms the in-between link evolution from pentikoro to subsequent ships. Biremes were made with thirty or fifty oars and the dimensions of these ships are between: 18-22m length, 3-4 m width, 22 tones displacement and the length of the oars 4-6 m. The most famous biremes were made in Samos from tyrant Polykrates and were named samaines. It was a special type of biremes, made in such a way so that could be used as a tanker and as a battle ship in the same time. For greater stability of the ship the Phoenicians lowered the crinolines (platforms where oarsmen sat). A massive bronze covered battering ram was the main weapon of this narrow high speed bireme. The traditional removable rig was typical. A decorative poop extremity of stern was abruptly bent, similarly to a tail of a scorpion, and the balustrade of the battle platform was covered with the shields of warriors for reinforcement. Phoenicians were considered as the best seamen of the time and many ancient states frequently used them as mercenaries.

See also

 

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HISTORY

A bireme is an ancient oared warship (galley) with two decks of oars, invented and used by Greeks even before the 6th century BC. Biremes were long vessels built for military purposes, had relatively high speed, meticulous construction, strength, and depending on the number of rows of oars, were called uniremes, biremes, triremes, quadriremes, etc.

Description

The name bireme comes from "bi-" meaning two and "-reme" meaning oar.

It was typically about 80 feet (24 m) long with a maximum beam width of around 10 feet (3 m). It was modified from the penteconter, a ship that had only one set of oars on each side, the bireme having two sets of oars on each side. The bireme was twice the triaconter's length and height, and thus employed 120 rowers. Biremes were galleys, galleasses, dromons, and small pleasure crafts pamphyles.

The next development, the trireme, keeping the length of the bireme, added a tier to the height, the rowers being thus increased to 180. It also had a large square sail.

Uses

These ships were frequently used by the Romans, as during the second of Caesar's invasions of Britain. The bireme eventually evolved into the trireme. A unit commandant (who was given a tent on the open deck) directed a group of marines. The bireme was recorded in ancient history on 8th-century Assyrian reliefs.

Medieval galleys are also described as "bireme" or "trireme" depending on the number of their banks of oars. The terminology can lead to confusion, since the terms are also used for rowed warships of the Greco-Roman period built on entirely different design principles.

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Packing:

Model is packed with mast fully assembled. Model is ready for display.

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CONSTRUCTION

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